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North Cemetery, Hartlepool

 

In the summer of 2013 Tees Archaeology, along with the Friends of North Cemetery, Hartlepool and a group of volunteers, carried out a trial excavation on the former site of the North Cemetery lodge and the two chapels.

As part of the project the volunteers and Friends also carried out detailed recording on some of the surviving memorials within the cemetery.

View of North Cemetery
   

The cemetery, originally called the West Hartlepool Cemetery, was opened in 1856 to serve the expanding port and town of West Hartlepool .

It was sited on the huge mound of spoil which had been excavated from the 1840s onwards to create the new docks.

The buildings themselves were built of magnesium limestone blocks, which were probably also quarried from the docks.

Cemetery chapel excavation
   

The cemetery was served by a full time Superintendent who lived in the lodge with his family. The two chapels were required for separate Church of England and Nonconformist use, though the excavation found that they were very similar in appearance, with identical window glass being used for both. The cemetery was also divided into separate consecrated, unconsecrated and Roman Catholic areas for burials. The cemetery expanded rapidly to the east and north throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, as the town grew around it and eventually enclosed it, and continued in regular use until the 1950s.

Clay pipe from excavations
   

North Cemetery Report

If you would like to know more about the project, please download the report and figures:-

Report Text Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4
         
Fig 5 Fig 6 Fig 7 Fig 8 Fig 9-17

For more information about the cemetery please visit the:-

Friends of North Cemetery Website

Monument in North Cemetery
   
 

Tees Archaeology, Sir William Gray House, Clarence Road, Hartlepool TS24 8BT

Tel. 01429 523455 | email teesarchaeology@hartlepool.gov.uk | © Tees Archaeology